Perambulations

absedarian:

// A handful of female German pilots in the 1930s:
Elly Beinhorn (1907-2007), long distance pilot; flew to Africa in 1931
Christl-Marie Schultes (1904-1976)
Hanna Reitsch (1912-1979), test pilot for the Luftwaffe, held about 40 flying records
Melitta Schenk Gräfin von Stauffenberg (1903-1945), inventor and pilot
Beate Uhse (1919-2001), only female stunt pilot in the 1930s

heatherannehogan:

My recap of this week’s Defiance explores some residual Bering and Wells feelings. 


It means someone really wanted our initials to spell out SHIELD.

It means someone really wanted our initials to spell out SHIELD.

district12er:

lucyameliaelisabethjesssamjane:

I can’t, not reblog. Its just too good. 

Dean’s gun, Merida’s arrow and Captain America’s shield - fucking best of the lot.

stuffmomnevertoldyou:

sciencechicks:

Maria Gaetana Agnesi (1718-1799) was an Italian mathematician who wrote the first book discussing both differential and integral calculus. She was also an honorary member of the faculty at the University of Bologna.
Maria was born in Milan to a wealthy family. She was recognized early as a child prodigy. When she was 9 years old, she composed and delivered an hour-long speech in Latin to some of the most distinguished intellectuals of the day. By her thirteenth birthday she had acquired Greek, Hebrew, Spanish, German, Latin, and was referred to as the “Walking Polyglot”. Maria was shy by nature and did not like all these public meetings. Around 15, she devoted her study to differential and integral calculus and avoided all social interactions. She also taught her siblings. 
She wrote the book Instituzioni analitiche ad uso della gioventù italiana, published in 1748. The first volume discusses the analysis of finite quantities and the second of the analysis of infinitesimals. 
In 1750, she was appointed by Pope Benedict XIV to the chair of mathematics and natural philosophy and physics at Bologna. She was the first women appointed as a mathematics professor at a university. After the death of her father in 1752 she took to the study of theology and devoted herself to the poor, homeless, and sick. After holding for some years the office of director of the Hospice Trivulzio for Blue Nuns at Milan, she herself joined the sisterhood.

smartypants. Or would that be smartypetticoats?

stuffmomnevertoldyou:

sciencechicks:

Maria Gaetana Agnesi (1718-1799) was an Italian mathematician who wrote the first book discussing both differential and integral calculus. She was also an honorary member of the faculty at the University of Bologna.

Maria was born in Milan to a wealthy family. She was recognized early as a child prodigy. When she was 9 years old, she composed and delivered an hour-long speech in Latin to some of the most distinguished intellectuals of the day. By her thirteenth birthday she had acquired Greek, Hebrew, Spanish, German, Latin, and was referred to as the “Walking Polyglot”. Maria was shy by nature and did not like all these public meetings. Around 15, she devoted her study to differential and integral calculus and avoided all social interactions. She also taught her siblings. 

She wrote the book Instituzioni analitiche ad uso della gioventù italiana, published in 1748. The first volume discusses the analysis of finite quantities and the second of the analysis of infinitesimals. 

In 1750, she was appointed by Pope Benedict XIV to the chair of mathematics and natural philosophy and physics at Bologna. She was the first women appointed as a mathematics professor at a university. After the death of her father in 1752 she took to the study of theology and devoted herself to the poor, homeless, and sick. After holding for some years the office of director of the Hospice Trivulzio for Blue Nuns at Milan, she herself joined the sisterhood.

smartypants. Or would that be smartypetticoats?

thisistheverge:

Take a look at the Nic Cage ‘Superman’ movie that Tim Burton and Kevin Smith almost made
In the late ’90s, Kevin Smith, Tim Burton, and Nicolas Cage teamed up to make what easily would have become either the most amazing or the most terrible Superman film ever made. Unfortunately, neither happened. After a long production period, the movie ultimately was put on hold and never made, much to the disappointment and/or relief of fans.

thisistheverge:

Take a look at the Nic Cage ‘Superman’ movie that Tim Burton and Kevin Smith almost made
In the late ’90s, Kevin Smith, Tim Burton, and Nicolas Cage teamed up to make what easily would have become either the most amazing or the most terrible Superman film ever made. Unfortunately, neither happened. After a long production period, the movie ultimately was put on hold and never made, much to the disappointment and/or relief of fans.

dlubes:

Thank you. Thank you so much for this.

dlubes:

Thank you. Thank you so much for this.

vintageanchorbooks:

Can’t get to Comic-Con? Enter Knopf and Pantheon’s giveaway to get all the good stuff with none of the hassle…
Featuring:
- Advance copy of Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami
- Tigerman by Nick Harkaway
- Advance copy of The Secret History of Wonder Woman by Jill Lepore and Wonder Woman inspired bracelets
- Advance b&w copies of Sugar Skull by Charles Burns and Shoplifter by Michael Cho
- Buttons celebrating Anne Rice’s new Vampire Chronicles novel, Prince Lestat
- And More!

vintageanchorbooks:

Can’t get to Comic-Con? Enter Knopf and Pantheon’s giveaway to get all the good stuff with none of the hassle…

Featuring:

- Advance copy of Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami

Tigerman by Nick Harkaway

- Advance copy of The Secret History of Wonder Woman by Jill Lepore and Wonder Woman inspired bracelets

- Advance b&w copies of Sugar Skull by Charles Burns and Shoplifter by Michael Cho

- Buttons celebrating Anne Rice’s new Vampire Chronicles novel, Prince Lestat

- And More!

dealanexmachina:

thejesusandmarxchain:

"Consent is sexy."

No. Consent is mandatory. Do not sexualize consent

This one post nails all the things I never thought about in today’s debate until I read this. Thank you for making this post.

I had asked Jolie a few days ago if I could fly with her, and she told me she had never taken a passenger up before but would think about it. When I arrived at the photo shoot, I told her that I mentioned to my mother that I might fly with her and that my mother did not like the idea one bit. Jolie laughed it off. Now, as I am watching her kick off her stilettos (she pilots barefoot) and step up onto the wing of her little white plane, she stops for a second and stares at me standing off to the side. There is a glint in her eye. A big smile spreads across her face. “Let’s go scare your mother,” she says.

Only as I am jammed in the back next to Leibovitz, bumping along the dinky little runway, does the reality of what I’m doing sink in. I imagine the headline: ANGELINA JOLIE AND ANNIE LEIBOVITZ DIE IN PLANE CRASH NEAR LAS VEGAS. I try to remember who went down with Patsy Cline, but I can’t. I am about to become a trivia question. I tell myself this will be a suitably fabulous way to die, and just like that we are in the air, floating above the desert, and my nerves are gone. “I’ll do some tight turns,” says Jolie. “Maddox likes it when there are g-forces.” [x]

wwnorton:

Elizabeth Green’s New York Times Magazine feature on math education in America is getting people talking. It’s currently the most emailed article on nytimes.com. 

Read the article to find out why Americans stink at math, then check out Green’s new book Building a Better Teacher.