Perambulations
tastefullyoffensive:

[chrishallbeck]
NPR Science: Sorry, Lucy: The Myth Of The Misused Brain Is 100 Percent False
ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST:
If you went to the movie theater this weekend, you might've caught the latest Scarlett Johansson action movie called "Lucy." It's about a woman who develops superpowers by harnessing the full potential of her brain.
(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "LUCY")
SCARLETT JOHANSSON: I'm able to do things I've never done before. I feel everything and I can control the elements around me.
UNIDENTIFIED MAN: That's amazing.
WESTERVELT: You've probably heard this idea before. Most people only use 10% of their brains. The other 90% of the basically dormant. Well, in the movie "Lucy," Morgan Freeman gives us this what-if scenario?
(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "LUCY")
MORGAN FREEMAN: What if there was a way of accessing 100% of our brain? What might we be capable of?
DAVID EAGLEMAN: We would be capable of exactly what we're doing now, which is to say, we do use a hundred percent of our brain.
WESTERVELT: That is David Eagleman.
EAGLEMAN: I'm a neuroscientist at Baylor College of Medicine.
WESTERVELT: And he says, basically, all of us are like Lucy. We use all of our brains, all of time.
EAGLEMAN: Even when you're just sitting around doing nothing your brain is screaming with activity all the time, around the clock; even when you're asleep it's screaming with activity.
WESTERVELT: In other words, this is a total myth. Very wrong, but still very popular. Take this clip from an Ellen DeGeneres stand-up special.
(SOUNDBITE OF STAND-UP SPECIAL)
ELLEN DEGENERES: It's true, they say we use ten percent of our brain. Ten percent of our brain. And I think, imagine what we could accomplish if we used the other 60 percent? Do you know what I'm saying?
AUDIENCE: (LAUGHTER).
(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "TOMMY BOY")
DAVID SPADE: Let's say the average person uses ten percent of their brain.
WESTERVELT: It's even in the movie "Tommy Boy."
(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "TOMMY BOY")
SPADE: How much do you use? One and a half percent. The rest is clogged with malted hops and bong residue.
WESTERVELT: Ariana Anderson is a researcher at UCLA. She looks at brain scans all day long. And she says, if someone were actually using just ten percent of their brain capacity...
ARIANA ANDERSON: Well, they would probably be declared brain-dead.
WESTERVELT: Sorry, "Tommy Boy." No one knows exactly where this myth came from but it's been around since at least the early 1900's. So why is this wrong idea still so popular?
ANDERSON: Probably gives us some sort of hope that if we are doing things we shouldn't do, such as watching too much TV, alcohol abuse, well, it might be damaging our brain but it's probably damaging the 90 percent that we don't use. And that's not true. Whenever you're doing something that damages your brain, it's damaging something that's being used, and it's going to leave some sort of deficit behind.
EAGLEMAN: For a long time I've wondered, why is this such a sticky myth?
WESTERVELT: Again, David Eagleman.
EAGLEMAN: And I think it's because it gives us a sense that there's something there to be unlocked, that we could be so much better than we could. And really, this has the same appeal as any fairytale or superhero story. I mean, it's the neural equivalent to Peter Parker becoming Spiderman.
WESTERVELT: In other words, it's an idea that belongs in Hollywood.
nprfreshair:

George Takei became famous for his role in Star Trek as Mr. Sulu, but in the last decade, he’s drawn followers who admire him because of who he is—not just who he has played. The new documentary about his life is called To Be Takei.
He joins Fresh Air to talk about growing up in a Japanese internment camp, avoiding stereotypical roles, and coming out as gay at 68. 
Here he explains why he was closeted for most of his life: 

The thing that affected me in the early part of my career was … there was a very popular box office movie star — blonde, good-looking, good actor — named Tab Hunter. He was in almost every other movie that came out. He was stunningly good-looking and all-American in looks. And then one of the scandals sheets of that time — sort of like The Inquirertoday — exposed him as gay. And suddenly and abruptly, his career came to a stop.That was, to me, chilling and stunning. I was a young no-name actor, aspiring to build this career — and I knew that [if] it were known that I was gay, then there would be no point to my pursuing that career. I desperately and passionately wanted a career as an actor, so I chose to be in the closet. I lived a double life. And that means you always have your guard up. And it’s a very, very difficult and challenging way to live a life.

Photo by Kevin Scanlon via LA Weekly 

nprfreshair:

George Takei became famous for his role in Star Trek as Mr. Sulu, but in the last decade, he’s drawn followers who admire him because of who he is—not just who he has played. The new documentary about his life is called To Be Takei.

He joins Fresh Air to talk about growing up in a Japanese internment camp, avoiding stereotypical roles, and coming out as gay at 68. 

Here he explains why he was closeted for most of his life: 

The thing that affected me in the early part of my career was … there was a very popular box office movie star — blonde, good-looking, good actor — named Tab Hunter. He was in almost every other movie that came out. He was stunningly good-looking and all-American in looks. And then one of the scandals sheets of that time — sort of like The Inquirertoday — exposed him as gay. And suddenly and abruptly, his career came to a stop.

That was, to me, chilling and stunning. I was a young no-name actor, aspiring to build this career — and I knew that [if] it were known that I was gay, then there would be no point to my pursuing that career. I desperately and passionately wanted a career as an actor, so I chose to be in the closet. I lived a double life. And that means you always have your guard up. And it’s a very, very difficult and challenging way to live a life.

Photo by Kevin Scanlon via LA Weekly 

rasputinmaxim:

If you are always trying to be normal you will never know how amazing you can be.

~ Maya Angelou 

Art - Edgar Degas

rasputinmaxim:

If you are always trying to be normal you will never know how amazing you can be.

~ Maya Angelou

Art - Edgar Degas

breakingnews:

NC to stop fighting challenges to marriage amendment
WRAL: North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper said his office would no longer oppose challenges to the state’s constitutional amendment outlawing same-sex marriage.
The announcement comes after a three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that Virginia’s constitutional and statutory provisions barring gay marriage and denying recognition of such unions performed in other states violate the U.S. Constitution. 
Follow updates on Breaking News.
Photo: North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper (WRAL)

breakingnews:

NC to stop fighting challenges to marriage amendment

WRAL: North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper said his office would no longer oppose challenges to the state’s constitutional amendment outlawing same-sex marriage.

The announcement comes after a three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that Virginia’s constitutional and statutory provisions barring gay marriage and denying recognition of such unions performed in other states violate the U.S. Constitution.

Follow updates on Breaking News.

Photo: North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper (WRAL)

huntingtonlibrary:

Today on VERSO, a preview of “Your Country Calls! Posters of the First World War,” opening this Saturday (8/2) and running through Nov. 3.

captions:
I Want You for U.S. Army is one of about 40 posters that will go on view beginning Aug. 2 in “Your Country Calls! Posters of the First World War.” The poster was made in 1917 by James Montgomery Flagg (1877–1960). The Huntington Library, Art Galleries, and Botanical Gardens.

Treat ‘em Rough / Join the Tanks United States Tank Corps, United States, 1918, August William Hutaf (1879–1942), color lithograph. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

Enlist / On Which Side of the Window Are You?, United States, 1917, Laura Brey (dates unknown), color lithograph. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

For Every Fighter a Woman Worker, United States, American Lithographic Co., ca. 1918, Adolph Treidler (1886–1981), color lithograph. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

If You Can’t Enlist—Invest / Buy a Liberty Bond, United States, ca. 1918, Winsor McCay (ca. 1867–1934), color lithograph. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

the-rain-monster:

soft-goth-ryou:

carnivaldog:

gameandwatch:

dirtycartunes:

wtf

how are you getting that much momentum on the third kick

Because of swinging that head around real fast. Same effect as a whip.This is super badass, goddang.

These are so hard to pull off

I like his solid landing on his left foot.


P

the-rain-monster:

soft-goth-ryou:

carnivaldog:

gameandwatch:

dirtycartunes:

wtf

how are you getting that much momentum on the third kick

Because of swinging that head around real fast. Same effect as a whip.

This is super badass, goddang.

These are so hard to pull off

I like his solid landing on his left foot.

P

Raleigh fights and beats some dudes with staffs, and Mako is critical of every performance. The fight choreography is stunning, even for the sparring. Raleigh notices that Mako is supremely unimpressed at everything, and assumes it’s his opponents. She’s just like “No, it’s you, you could have finished every match two moves earlier, slackass.”

Raleigh, chagrined, invites her to spar with him in the ring. Mako’s hilarious “OMG CAN I????” face at Pentecost is my favorite thing in the world, but he’s immune. Until Raleigh goes “What’s the matter, Marshal? Don’t think your brightest can cut it in the ring with me?”

Pentecost takes Mako’s clipboard, all “We shall feast on his remains, but bring me his head to adorn the Wall of Those Who Did Not Respect This Hustle.”

typeworship:

Something Wonderful in the post

Martina Flor, based in Berlin, is embarking on a charming side project to design and send lettered postcards to people she likes, loves, knows or wants to get in touch with around the world. 

Each of the 100 planned postcards will be entirely made, written and sent by her periodically. Her dedicated blog, Letter Collections, documents the postcard design and receiver. I’ve picked a few of my favourites above. I’ll keep you posted if I’m lucky enough to receive one!

You maybe remember Martina’s work as part of last year’s Lettering vs. Calligraphy project and exhibition. You can see more of Martina’s work on her Tumlbr.

tastefullyoffensive:

"He likes to hold his own feet." -110110

tastefullyoffensive:

"He likes to hold his own feet." -110110

Reblog if you made a good friend on tumblr.

i’m here for the ladies → parker

Non-sequential serial numbers, my favorite. [sniffs money]